Your Health

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For Kidney, Liver and Full Blood Count reference ranges click scanned results

Kidneys

Anabolic/Androgenic Steroids (AAS) use can cause hypertension (high blood pressure) through retention of sodium by the kidneys, and increasing overall blood volume. This will result in additional renal (kidney) and cardiovascular (heart and blood vessels) strain. Additionally, AAS drugs are excreted from the body through the kidneys. Heavy training coupled with a high protein diet can be taxing on the kidneys, though this is not usually hazardous in itself, unless it exacerbates an underlying medical condition. It is recommended an athlete monitors their kidney function particularly if using any other performance enhancing drugs.

Blood Count

By raising heamatocrit (packed cell volume) and red blood cell count, the blood becomes more viscous (sticky) with a higher tendency to clot. This can increase the risk of stroke or heart attack. Other drugs, EPO for example (notoriously popular with endurance athletes such as cyclists), raise haemoglobin concentrations and are administered medically in patients with chronic kidney disorders. Raised white cell count (WCC) is a very frequent trend noted by Vitruvian Man in those who inject underground lab products. WCC is raised as a result of infection.

Lipid Profile

Studies prove definitively that AAS use decreases HDL (High Density Lipoprotein – good cholesterol) and increases LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein – bad cholesterol). Over time this leads to plaque deposits and narrowing in major blood vessels. Aromatase inhibitors and other PIEDs negatively alter blood lipid profiles.

Overall cardiovascular disease risk factors significantly increase due to alterations in blood lipid profiles and changes which occur to the blood. For further details click on Cholesterol

Liver Function

Most oral Anabolic/Androgenic Steroids are C-17 alpha alkylated (chemically altered to resist being broken down by the liver) to prolong the time they’re active in the body. This places the liver under considerable strain throughout the duration of the cycle. These oral steroids are known to be hepatotoxic (toxic to the liver) and, if used, should be used with caution and moderation. A number of injectable steroids (including the popular steroid Deca-Durabolin) place the liver under additional strain.

Other ancillary drugs such Roaccutane, often used to help control acne related side effects of steroids have a negative impact on liver function, as do numerous other PIEDs.

Hormone Levels

Excess testosterone from AAS administration leads to the shutdown of natural testosterone in the testes. This results in testicular atrophy (shrinkage), fatigue, decreased sex drive and depression post cycle. In addition, excess testosterone is converted to the female hormone oestrogen and the androgenic hormone DHT which can occupy androgen receptors in the body causing side effects such as male pattern baldness and prostate enlargement. See About AAS for further details.

Glucose (blood sugar)

Effected by hypoglycaemics, thyroid medications, growth hormone and IGF-1. For indepth, detailed information click on the PIEDs page.

Thyroid function

Your throid can be effected by Growth Hormone administration. It is advisable to have functioning tested prior and during GH use.

The use of thyroid drugs (T3 and T4) will have a suppressive effect on natural Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) with the risk of progressing to hypothyroidism.

Blood Borne Viruses

Increased risk of contracting HIV and/or HIV by injecting drug use.

If you’ve ever injected drugs, particularly if you’ve ever been injected by someone else, shared any injecting equipment or vials it is important to be tested.

See Underground Labs page for further information on injectable steroids.

 

Taking performance and image enhancing drugs can be playing roulette with your health. Monitor it closely. When you gamble long enough, the house always wins.

 

Vitruvian Man – Squaring the circle of men’s health

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